Shadows (1959) – Living in the Shadows, by Darrell Ron Tuffs

The first film to be directed by John Cassavetes, Shadows, was perhaps the start of what we now know as American independent cinema. Shadows was groundbreaking at the time of its release, although not particularly financially successful, it was critically acclaimed, despite being made for less than the average television programme. Filmed during the same…

Filth (2013) Jon S. Baird (Maria Tudosescu)

Rating: 4.5/5 My friend told me a while ago that I would like this movie, especially following my recent obsession with James McAvoy; I am so glad I took her advice. For quite a while, I have been interested in finding out more and more about the Scottish actor, and while I knew he was…

Dredd (2012) – Pete Travis (Niall McArdle)

Summary: Mega-City One vetran cop Judge Dredd (Karl Urban) and rookie Anderson (Olivia Thirlby) are trapped in Mega-Block Peach Trees, and have to fend off a vicious drug gang run by the ruthless Ma Ma (Lena Headey). It is impossible to think of the British comic 2000 AD without thinking of its most famous character,…

White Dog (1982) – The Four-Legged Time Bomb, by Darrell Ron Tuffs

Samuel Fuller’s last American film, White Dog, was, not surprisingly, a financial failure, and was never given a wide American release. Also not surprising, was the critical success this failure came with. The film is almost perfectly constructed, and is extremely forceful and frank in delivering its underlining cultural themes. This is to the film’s…

The Shawshank Redemption (1994) Frank Darabont (Niall McArdle)

Massive Spoilers for the three people on the planet who haven`t seen it. “Get busy living, or get busy dying.” It’s fitting that The Shawshank Redemption was made for Warner Bros. The studio pretty much invented the prison picture, and Warner pen epics like Twenty Thousand Years in Sing Sing, San Quentin, and Each Dawn…

Is Television Inferior to Cinema Artistically? by Darrell Ron Tuffs

This essay is copyright of Darrell Ron Tuffs, please use references if using any of this information in your own work.  Until recent years, cinema had always held a large artistic dominance over television. The cinema has always been home to huge spectacle films that, for the most part, remain firmly on top of the…

Lunch Hour (1962) – Time to Get Alone, by Darrell Ron Tuffs

The story started its life as a radio play on the BBC Third Programme, and was later brought to the London stage in 1961. But, none of these portrays where as interesting or original as James Hill’s film version of Lunch Hour in 1962. This version, produced by Eyeline Films, was not a huge success…

Les Bicyclettes de Belsize (1969) Douglas Hickox (Darrell Ron Tuffs)

Short films can often become overlooked while searching for hidden cinematic gems from the past. This is particularly true of the 1969 Douglas Hickox short film, Les Bicyclettes de Belsize. The film is itself, a mini trip to, or back to, the heart of swinging 60s London. With its new wave vibe and strong sense…

Reservoir Dogs (1992) – Quentin Tarantino (Niall McArdle)

Has it really been more than twenty years since Quentin Tarantino shocked and thrilled audiences with his audacious, breezily confident debut film, Reservoir Dogs? The Sundance darling – it was one of the films that put ‘indie cinema’ squarely in the eye of the mainstream – put off many filmgoers because of its violence and…

The Good Time Girls (1960) Claude Chabrol (Darrell Ron Tuffs)

Claude Chabrol’s forth feature film The Good Time Girls, was released in 1960, the same year as Godard’s landmark film Breathless, and, just one year after Truffaut’s career-launching The 400 Blows. Chabrol’s film can often feel inferior to these other French new wave masterpieces at first glance. But, while looking deeper into the film, a…

The Great Gatsby (2013) Baz Luhrmann (Kate McBride)

In 1925, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald – a splendid name, eh? – wrote The Great Gatsby. And in 2013, when Baz Luhrmann got his hands on it, he transformed a classic 180 page novel into a 142 minute film. That’s just over one page per minute, following an uncomfortable trend in modern movies for those…

Ed Wood (1994) – Tim Burton (Gunnar von Cowtown)

Originally posted to the excellence site Retro In The 90s After reflecting on the Joe Bob’s Drive-In Theatre post, perhaps the most important function of the horror movie host was telling all the stories behind the story shown on screen. The horror host’s knowledge added layers of context and depth to what basically amounted to…

Panic Room (2002) – David Fincher (Mikhail Karadimov)

Originally Posted at betweenframes.net. Come check out other reviews written by Mikhail Karadimov Panic Room has long been derided as one of Fincher’s lesser films. Maybe people had trouble accepting Fincher’s supposedly lame shift in subject matter—from the visceral, “in your face” bombast of Fight Club, to the restrained, small-scale follow-up of Panic Room—or maybe…

Desert Island Directors

Image this scene, it is ordered that you are going to be sent off to an unknown desert island. Before you go, you are told that you can take with you the entire body of work from five film directors to view on the island. You may never escape from this island, so any films…

Roman Holiday (1953) – William Wyler (Niall McArdle)

Cyd Charisse. Marilyn Monroe. Jane Russell. Donna Reed. Deborah Kerr. Hollywod had an array of beautiful women on-screen in 1953, each in their own way wordly and sexy. But it was a different, schoolgirlish beauty that captivated the world that year, when an elfin, dark-haired Audrey Hepburn spent the day in Rome in the company…

Enough Said (2013) – Nicole Holofcenter (Mikhail Karadimov)

Originally Posted at betweenframes.net. Come check out other reviews written by Mikhail Karadimov. It’s odd to see the late-great James Gandolfini’s large, meaty hands—so endearingly referred to as “paddles” by Julie Luis-Dreyfus’s small and ferrety masseuse Eva— softened by cutting lemons, pulling grass, serving pasta, doing everything but wrapping around someone’s throat and snuffing the…

The Hunt (2012) – Thomas Vinterberg (Mikhail Karadimov)

Originally Posted at betweenframes.net. Come check out other reviews written by Mikhail Karadimov. Trained in our scopes—beaded down on the bull’s-eye of our aim—are other people. Our judgments click and snap like the charge of a high-powered rifle shot, assassinating anyone and everyone weird, isolated, and only tenuously connected to society in an ostensibly “normal”…

Planet of the Apes – Franklin. J. Shaffner (1968) (Niall McArdle)

Synposis: Thousands of years in the future, astronauts from earth crash-land on a planet ruled by apes. I recently met somebody who has never seen Planet of the Apes, and so has lived a life blissfully unaware of the film’s cheesy appeal and its much-admired, seldom-equalled shock ending. How has she managed this? How has…

Representations of Revolutionary Struggle

As with all art forms, the cinema offers a wide and far-reaching platform of expression, one that may be used to provoke many contrasting ideas and opinions. The moving image can be used for good or evil, hate or love, war or peace. Cinema can be more powerful than a bomb when used tactfully and…

The Great Dictator (1940) – Charles Chaplin (Darrell Ron Tuffs)

Dictator Adenoid Hynkel has a doppelganger, a poor but kind Jewish barber living in the slums, who one day, is mistaken for Hynkel. For being made at the very height of World War 2, The Great Dictator is an extremely brave film. It could have only been made if enough passion and commitment was present…

Wings (1927) William A. Wellman (Darrell Ron Tuffs)

(Note: This post was originally written for the review site Battleship Pretension. See the full article HERE) Wings is a 1927 American silent film about two World War I fighter pilot friends, both involved with the same beauty, produced by Lucien Hubbard, directed by William A. Wellman and released by Paramount Pictures. William A. Wellman’s…

Only Lovers Left Alive (2014) – Jim Jarmusch (Claire Sharp)

Set against the romantic desolation of Detroit and Tangier, an underground musician, deeply depressed by the direction of human activities, reunites with his resilient and enigmatic lover. Their love story has already endured several centuries at least, but their debauched idyll is soon disrupted by her wild and uncontrollable younger sister. Can these wise but fragile…

Please Help and Comment!

Recently, I took part in a university project in which I developed the idea and wrote the script for this short film. As part of the project, the film needs some audience feedback. So, for a short while, a link will be here at A World of Film. I would be so grateful if you…

Vampyr (1932) – Carl Theodor Dryer (Mardaweh Tompo)

Synopsis: Allan Gray arrives at an inn to sleep only to be aroused by mysterious happenings at the inn that leads him to an eventful stay. Carl Theodor Dryer was a master of elevating every element in film to its most transcendent level by stripping away the theatrical or ornamental that dominated popular cinema at…

Sponsor Page!

Become a Sponsor Check out our new sponsor page For a short amount of time, we have been looking for a sponsor for “A World of Film”. We are still a relatively small site. However, our traffic grows each day, as the site becomes more popular. Our sponsorship plan is as follows. A link to…

My Neighbour Totoro (1988) Hayao Miyazaki (Darrell Ron Tuffs)

Two young girls, Satsuki and her younger sister Mei, move into a house in the country with their father to be closer to their hospitalized mother. Satsuki and Mei discover a nearby forest, inhabited by magical creatures. They befriend these creatures, and are soon embarking on magical adventures with them. With the release of My…

Poll: Film Criticism

Since the days of Pauline Kael, Andrew Sarris or even Siskel and Ebert, the face of film criticism has changed dramatically. Now with a huge amount of social media, it seems anyone anywhere can share their personal opinions of films old and new. What kind of impact is this having on good old film criticism…

The 86th Academy Awards: Best Picture

Whether you enjoy the Academy Awards or not, they are always an interesting reflection of the past year of film. However, the most interesting and most memorable award is always best picture. The winner is seldom the favourite of many filmgoers. There have been many huge surprises over the years, and unfortunately many snubs of…

The Turin Horse (2011) – Béla Tarr (Jane McCracken)

Incessant wind… a dirge of clawing violins on repeat… ’Doom’ on his hands and knees, crawling ever closer with each sunset, along his impending trail of inevitable cataclysm, until finally he reaches the desolate cottage on the Hungarian plains.

Le Samourai (1967) – Jean Pierre Melville (Pete Johnson)

Hitman Jef Costello is a perfectionist who always carefully plans his murders and who never gets caught. One night however, after killing a night-club owner, he’s seen by witnesses. His efforts to provide himself with an alibi fail and more and more he gets driven into a corner.

The Cinema Needs You!

Add us on Facebook or Twitter and get updates on every post we make. (links below) Spread the word of our site. We are still calling for guest posts. Remember, any film worth discussing, no matter how big or small. We will cover it. We are passionate about telling anyone who is willing to listen…

Whip It (2009) – Drew Barrymore (Sarah Myles)

The 2009 directorial debut of Drew Barrymore – Whip It – is arguably the ultimate feminist movie. While that may seem to be a fairly bold statement, it is absolutely the case that this film embodies everything that representation of women in media should be striving for.

Your Favourite Female Director?

In a world dominated by male film directors, it is often overlooked that there have been some fine female directors during the history of film. This question is not often addressed or discussed. That is why we at A World Of Film would like to know – who is your favourite female director? Which has…

The Legend of the Scarecrow (2005) – Marco Besas (Isabelle Birch)

The Legend of the Scarecrow (La leyenda del espantapájaros) is a 10 minute short Spanish film about a lonely scarecrow who befriends birds and heals a bird that thinks that scarecrows are evil. The Scarecrow is caught and is locked in the windmill which they burn and the crows scatter his ashes.