Timbuktu: Sequence Analysis

This is an unpublished essay completed for my BA Film Studies course a little under a year and a half ago. The piece is a little less polished than my recent work, but I hope is a interesting read none the less.

Mulholland Drive (2001) Eric Norcross

When I first saw Mulholland Drive at a second-run theater in downtown Portland, Maine, I hated it. I was angry that it existed. How could anyone finance this thing? I was right out of film school and as a result I had been blinded by the false idea that films had to flow at a…

A World of Film’s Top 10 of 2016

2016 was jam-packed with controversy and conflict. No matter what side of anything you were on, I think the year could most appropriately be described as a never-ending fight between ‘hope’ and’ regret’. This, I feel, is reflected within my list of favourite films from 2016; some hold a deeply troubling vision of the future,…

It Follows and Musically Uncanny

“This thing … it’s gonna follow you.” As Hugh speaks these unnerving words to Jay during the first act of David Robert Mitchell’s, It Follows (2014), we could be mistaken in thinking these words refer to the film’s music as well as its plot. The film is an effective horror film, taking many visual and…

A Film to Remember, by Darrell Tuffs

Already an established contemporary video artist and filmmaker, Omer Fast has directed a range of short films challenging the conventions of storytelling, particularly focusing on the concept of reality, representation, and the fragile line between the two. For this reason, Fast would seem the perfect candidate to tackle Tom McCarthy’s mind-bender of a novel, Remainder;…

A Tale of One City: Cinematic London in Contemporary British Cinema

From the expressionistic and bold portrait of London in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1927 film, The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog, through to the modern metropolis of scenic icons and vast scale depicted in Sam Mendes’s 2012 film, Skyfall, London has forever been an important cinematic city, holding centuries of history, cultural style, and filmic…

Film Note: Edge of Tomorrow (Live. Die. Repeat.)

Doug Liman’s first big break onto the Hollywood directing scene was the low-budget comedy, Swingers (1996). The film cost just $200,000 to make, and saw a domestic US box office return of $4.6m, a fairly successful amount for such a small-scale production. (1) A few years later, Liman would begin to dip his toes into…

The Hateful Eight

While viewing Tarantino’s eagerly awaited 8th feature film, The Hateful Eight, two conflicting opinions were passionately arguing within my brain. The first was telling me, “This film is absolutely beautiful; a real cinematic treat!” Indeed, as one might expect from Tarantino, The Hateful Eight is a gorgeously crisp film. Shot on celluloid, and set within…

Sex and Death, by Darrell Tuffs

CLICK HERE to read my review of the wonderfully effective new horror film, It Follows, over at Battleship Pretension. Thank you!

Everlasting Moments (2008) – Jan Troell (Pete Johnson)

As well as a lifetime romance with cinema and films, I have also had an interest in photography for the last thirty years. My favourite films are almost always foreign language productions, latterly known as ‘World Cinema’. There have been films made about photographers, and others featuring significant characters who happen to be photographers. These…

Filth (2013) Jon S. Baird (Maria Tudosescu)

Rating: 4.5/5 My friend told me a while ago that I would like this movie, especially following my recent obsession with James McAvoy; I am so glad I took her advice. For quite a while, I have been interested in finding out more and more about the Scottish actor, and while I knew he was…

Dredd (2012) – Pete Travis (Niall McArdle)

Summary: Mega-City One vetran cop Judge Dredd (Karl Urban) and rookie Anderson (Olivia Thirlby) are trapped in Mega-Block Peach Trees, and have to fend off a vicious drug gang run by the ruthless Ma Ma (Lena Headey). It is impossible to think of the British comic 2000 AD without thinking of its most famous character,…

The Great Gatsby (2013) Baz Luhrmann (Kate McBride)

In 1925, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald – a splendid name, eh? – wrote The Great Gatsby. And in 2013, when Baz Luhrmann got his hands on it, he transformed a classic 180 page novel into a 142 minute film. That’s just over one page per minute, following an uncomfortable trend in modern movies for those…

Panic Room (2002) – David Fincher (Mikhail Karadimov)

Originally Posted at betweenframes.net. Come check out other reviews written by Mikhail Karadimov Panic Room has long been derided as one of Fincher’s lesser films. Maybe people had trouble accepting Fincher’s supposedly lame shift in subject matter—from the visceral, “in your face” bombast of Fight Club, to the restrained, small-scale follow-up of Panic Room—or maybe…

Enough Said (2013) – Nicole Holofcenter (Mikhail Karadimov)

Originally Posted at betweenframes.net. Come check out other reviews written by Mikhail Karadimov. It’s odd to see the late-great James Gandolfini’s large, meaty hands—so endearingly referred to as “paddles” by Julie Luis-Dreyfus’s small and ferrety masseuse Eva— softened by cutting lemons, pulling grass, serving pasta, doing everything but wrapping around someone’s throat and snuffing the…

The Hunt (2012) – Thomas Vinterberg (Mikhail Karadimov)

Originally Posted at betweenframes.net. Come check out other reviews written by Mikhail Karadimov. Trained in our scopes—beaded down on the bull’s-eye of our aim—are other people. Our judgments click and snap like the charge of a high-powered rifle shot, assassinating anyone and everyone weird, isolated, and only tenuously connected to society in an ostensibly “normal”…

Only Lovers Left Alive (2014) – Jim Jarmusch (Claire Sharp)

Set against the romantic desolation of Detroit and Tangier, an underground musician, deeply depressed by the direction of human activities, reunites with his resilient and enigmatic lover. Their love story has already endured several centuries at least, but their debauched idyll is soon disrupted by her wild and uncontrollable younger sister. Can these wise but fragile…

The Turin Horse (2011) – Béla Tarr (Jane McCracken)

Incessant wind… a dirge of clawing violins on repeat… ’Doom’ on his hands and knees, crawling ever closer with each sunset, along his impending trail of inevitable cataclysm, until finally he reaches the desolate cottage on the Hungarian plains.

Whip It (2009) – Drew Barrymore (Sarah Myles)

The 2009 directorial debut of Drew Barrymore – Whip It – is arguably the ultimate feminist movie. While that may seem to be a fairly bold statement, it is absolutely the case that this film embodies everything that representation of women in media should be striving for.

The Legend of the Scarecrow (2005) – Marco Besas (Isabelle Birch)

The Legend of the Scarecrow (La leyenda del espantapájaros) is a 10 minute short Spanish film about a lonely scarecrow who befriends birds and heals a bird that thinks that scarecrows are evil. The Scarecrow is caught and is locked in the windmill which they burn and the crows scatter his ashes.  

HOLY MOTORS – Directed by Leos Carax

Directed by Leos Carax, Holy Motors tells the story of a mysterious man Monsieur Oscar (Denis Lavant) as he spends his day travelling around Paris in a stretched limo. The limo and its driver Celine (Edith Scob) take Oscar to designated locations within the city. Each location beholds a unique situation that Oscar must act…

Gravity – Alfonso Cuarón

Short Plot Summary: A medical engineer and an astronaut work together to survive after an accident leaves them adrift in space.