In Living Colour: American Broadcast News on Film

I recently wrote an essay regarding political representations of TV news in film by comparing Network (1976) with Christine (2016). The essay focuses on the political ideology of TV news, attempting to work out what value such media holds in communatating truths to mass audiences, while asking if this is even possible when situated within…

Director Knockout: Final Results

After a month and a half of voting, the winner of A World of Film’s Director Knockout has been declared… and the third place, runner up, and winner goes to… Alfred Hitchcock! (Final bracket results HERE) In the end, there wasn’t much competition for Hitchcock, winning every round against some very heavyweight directors very comfortably…

Director Knockout: The Final

VOTE NOW! It takes only 10 seconds Click in each match to state your chosen director; the director with the most votes will win Director Knockout! In the end, only one director can win, becoming the ‘A World of Film’ champion. Click HERE to see the updated bracket. The Final: Third Place:

Director Knockout: Semifinal Results

Thanks to everyone who voted in the semifinal of Director Knockout! (two very close matches) Click HERE to see the updated bracket. Here are the results: The finals. Voting starts soon!

Director Knockout: Round 3 Results

Thanks to everyone who voted in round 3 of Director Knockout! Click HERE to see the updated bracket. Here are the results: The next round. Voting starts soon!

Director Knockout: Round 3

VOTE NOW! It takes only 20 seconds Click in each match to state your chosen director; the director with the most votes will progress to round semifinals next week. In the end, only one director can win, becoming the ‘A World of Film’ champion. Click HERE to see the updated bracket. Round 3 Matches:

Director Knockout: Round 2 Results

Thanks to everyone who voted in round 2 of Director Knockout! Click HERE to see the updated bracket. Here are the results: The next round. Voting starts soon!

Director Knockout! Round 2

VOTE NOW! (closing soon) It takes only 20 seconds Click in each match to state your chosen director; the director with the most votes will progress to round 3 next week. In the end, only one director can win, becoming the ‘A World of Film’ champion. Click HERE to see the updated bracket. Round 2 Matches

Director Knockout: Round 1 – Results

Thanks to everyone who voted in round 1 of Director Knockout! Click HERE to see the updated bracket. Here are the results: Lynch vs. Capra David Lynch (63%) Frank Capra (38%) – Lynch wins Kurosawa vs. Lang Akira Kurosawa (67%) Fritz Lang (33%) – Kurosawa wins  Chaplin vs. Griffith Charlie Chaplin (57%) D.W. Griffith (43%) – Chaplin wins…

Director Knockout! Round 1

VOTE NOW! Who will be crowned best director by the readers, writers, and followers of A World of Film?

An Archaeology of the Close-Up

I recently wrote an academic essay exploring the historical and cultural origins of the cinematic close-up. The piece is a long read, but I think any reader interested in cinema history will find the ideas interesting. I worked hard on the essay and I’d be extremely grateful for anyone able to take some time to…

Video Work

Venue Hire This short film was made to promote the venue hire of the PESGB and the area that the charity is located.   Evening Lecture This video was made to encourage more members to attend the PESGB London Evening Lecture.   Council Election Interviews The next few videos are a series of interviews made…

Does ‘the Phantom of the Auteur’ Haunt French Cinema?

The haunting presence of the auteur has long loomed over the French film industry; it was in France itself that the auteur theory as a major film discussion was first established. Because of this, a long tradition dating back farther than (but popularized by) the French new wave had firmly placed the auteur at the…

Why Am I Still Watching This? By Darrell Tuffs

Michael Haneke’s Benny’s Video (1992) provides a rich array of moral and ethical questions to its viewer via both narrative and aesthetic, yet its key ethical significance is not established in answering these questions with any great conclusion, but rather, in successfully forcing its audience to actively contemplate and debate such questions; to ask, but…

A Tale of One City: Cinematic London in Contemporary British Cinema

From the expressionistic and bold portrait of London in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1927 film, The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog, through to the modern metropolis of scenic icons and vast scale depicted in Sam Mendes’s 2012 film, Skyfall, London has forever been an important cinematic city, holding centuries of history, cultural style, and filmic…

Film Note: Edge of Tomorrow (Live. Die. Repeat.)

Doug Liman’s first big break onto the Hollywood directing scene was the low-budget comedy, Swingers (1996). The film cost just $200,000 to make, and saw a domestic US box office return of $4.6m, a fairly successful amount for such a small-scale production. (1) A few years later, Liman would begin to dip his toes into…

The Last Metro: A Sequence Analysis

Click HERE to read by new essay, The Last Metro: A Sequence Analysis. The essay is posted to the great film site, Battleship Pretension.

Steamboat Bill Jr. (1928)

Buster Keaton, like Chaplin, will forever be respected as the most basic and fundamental pioneer of the comedy genre in film. But rarely mentioned with Keaton is how wonderfully composed and experimental he was with regard to creating action cinema, as well as a real and serious sense of physical vulnerability. And no, we’re not…

The Festival Circuit: A Short Screenplay, by Darrell Tuffs

Click the link to view my short screenplay, The Festival Circuit. I would be extremely grateful if anyone could leave a comment; let me know what you think. The Festival Circuit is the story of Harris, an up-and-coming indie director who falls asleep during a festival screening of his own film. Harris is quickly photographed while…

Smoke (1995) by Leila Murseljevic

I was asked the other day to, in just 5 seconds, name the first movie that pops on my mind, which fulfils the criteria of both simplicity and effectiveness at the same time. And let me tell you, for someone who takes the art of moving pictures very seriously, this was one of the toughest…

Paths of Glory (1957) Stanley Kubrick

Summary: During the First World War, the French military orders a court-martial accusing soldiers of cowardice after an attack on an enemy position fails. Spoilers It is a truism in the Army that shit rolls downhill, and in Paths of Glory Stanley Kubrick doesn’t argue with it; he just presents it for the nonsense it…

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011) Tomas Alfredson (Niall McArdle)

Summary: in the 1970s a retired spymaster is called back into MI6 to discover the identity of a Russian mole This is a war film of a much quieter but no less deadly order. Spoilers It’s impossible to talk about war in the twentieth century without discussing the Cold War, that intricate and deadly game…

Everlasting Moments (2008) – Jan Troell (Pete Johnson)

As well as a lifetime romance with cinema and films, I have also had an interest in photography for the last thirty years. My favourite films are almost always foreign language productions, latterly known as ‘World Cinema’. There have been films made about photographers, and others featuring significant characters who happen to be photographers. These…

The First Official “A World of Film Top 10!”

So, here it is, Voting has ended, meaning it’s time to uncover the top 10 most voted for films by our readers. Thank you to everyone that commented or sent your lists by email. It’s great to know that we are slowly building a community of people that simply love film. First, some thoughts, I…

It Happened One Night (1934) | Frank Capra (Eric Norcross)

An unemployed reporter helps a runaway heiress get back to New York without being discovered by the authorities. It Happened One Night is a road trip romantic comedy starring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert and was directed by Hollywood legend Frank Capra. Written by Robert Riskin and based off of Samuel Hopkins Adams’ short story,…

Seven (1995) – David Fincher (Niall McArdle)

SPOILERS! I was living in Korea when I first saw Seven (or Se7en, as it is sometimes pretentiously stylised). The print was dark so I couldn’t make out very much, and the sound in the cinema was appalling. I could barely hear the dialogue over the noise of incessant rain. My initial thought was that…

Filth (2013) Jon S. Baird (Maria Tudosescu)

Rating: 4.5/5 My friend told me a while ago that I would like this movie, especially following my recent obsession with James McAvoy; I am so glad I took her advice. For quite a while, I have been interested in finding out more and more about the Scottish actor, and while I knew he was…

Dredd (2012) – Pete Travis (Niall McArdle)

Summary: Mega-City One vetran cop Judge Dredd (Karl Urban) and rookie Anderson (Olivia Thirlby) are trapped in Mega-Block Peach Trees, and have to fend off a vicious drug gang run by the ruthless Ma Ma (Lena Headey). It is impossible to think of the British comic 2000 AD without thinking of its most famous character,…

White Dog (1982) – The Four-Legged Time Bomb, by Darrell Ron Tuffs

Samuel Fuller’s last American film, White Dog, was, not surprisingly, a financial failure, and was never given a wide American release. Also not surprising, was the critical success this failure came with. The film is almost perfectly constructed, and is extremely forceful and frank in delivering its underlining cultural themes. This is to the film’s…

The Shawshank Redemption (1994) Frank Darabont (Niall McArdle)

Massive Spoilers for the three people on the planet who haven`t seen it. “Get busy living, or get busy dying.” It’s fitting that The Shawshank Redemption was made for Warner Bros. The studio pretty much invented the prison picture, and Warner pen epics like Twenty Thousand Years in Sing Sing, San Quentin, and Each Dawn…

Reservoir Dogs (1992) – Quentin Tarantino (Niall McArdle)

Has it really been more than twenty years since Quentin Tarantino shocked and thrilled audiences with his audacious, breezily confident debut film, Reservoir Dogs? The Sundance darling – it was one of the films that put ‘indie cinema’ squarely in the eye of the mainstream – put off many filmgoers because of its violence and…

Panic Room (2002) – David Fincher (Mikhail Karadimov)

Originally Posted at betweenframes.net. Come check out other reviews written by Mikhail Karadimov Panic Room has long been derided as one of Fincher’s lesser films. Maybe people had trouble accepting Fincher’s supposedly lame shift in subject matter—from the visceral, “in your face” bombast of Fight Club, to the restrained, small-scale follow-up of Panic Room—or maybe…

Desert Island Directors

Image this scene, it is ordered that you are going to be sent off to an unknown desert island. Before you go, you are told that you can take with you the entire body of work from five film directors to view on the island. You may never escape from this island, so any films…

Roman Holiday (1953) – William Wyler (Niall McArdle)

Cyd Charisse. Marilyn Monroe. Jane Russell. Donna Reed. Deborah Kerr. Hollywod had an array of beautiful women on-screen in 1953, each in their own way wordly and sexy. But it was a different, schoolgirlish beauty that captivated the world that year, when an elfin, dark-haired Audrey Hepburn spent the day in Rome in the company…

The Hunt (2012) – Thomas Vinterberg (Mikhail Karadimov)

Originally Posted at betweenframes.net. Come check out other reviews written by Mikhail Karadimov. Trained in our scopes—beaded down on the bull’s-eye of our aim—are other people. Our judgments click and snap like the charge of a high-powered rifle shot, assassinating anyone and everyone weird, isolated, and only tenuously connected to society in an ostensibly “normal”…

Planet of the Apes – Franklin. J. Shaffner (1968) (Niall McArdle)

Synposis: Thousands of years in the future, astronauts from earth crash-land on a planet ruled by apes. I recently met somebody who has never seen Planet of the Apes, and so has lived a life blissfully unaware of the film’s cheesy appeal and its much-admired, seldom-equalled shock ending. How has she managed this? How has…

Representations of Revolutionary Struggle

As with all art forms, the cinema offers a wide and far-reaching platform of expression, one that may be used to provoke many contrasting ideas and opinions. The moving image can be used for good or evil, hate or love, war or peace. Cinema can be more powerful than a bomb when used tactfully and…