Musical Terror: It Follows and the Mastery of the Audibly Uncanny

“This thing … it’s gonna follow you.” As Hugh speaks these unnerving words to Jay during the first act of David Robert Mitchell’s, It Follows (2014), we could be mistaken in thinking these words refer to the film’s music as well as its plot. The film is an effective horror film, taking many visual and…

Two Sides of the Same Coin: Images and Power

For art historian and theorist Hans Belting, our understanding of images has, throughout the history of art and media theory, greatly undervalued our perception of images as distinctive from the media they live within, thus underestimating the power and influence they hold in shaping human history and the human body. Belting states that, “we are…

Where Have I Been?

If you follow this blog closely, you’ll have noticed that, recently, things have been a little quite on the western front when it comes to the amount of content posted over the last few months. I’ve been working at The Petroleum Exploration Society of Great Britain over this time (actually making films instead of just…

Does ‘the Phantom of the Auteur’ Haunt French Cinema?

The haunting presence of the auteur has long loomed over the French film industry; it was in France itself that the auteur theory as a major film discussion was first established. Because of this, a long tradition dating back farther than (but popularized by) the French new wave had firmly placed the auteur at the…

A Tale of One City: Cinematic London in Contemporary British Cinema

From the expressionistic and bold portrait of London in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1927 film, The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog, through to the modern metropolis of scenic icons and vast scale depicted in Sam Mendes’s 2012 film, Skyfall, London has forever been an important cinematic city, holding centuries of history, cultural style, and filmic…

The Last Metro: A Sequence Analysis

Click HERE to read by new essay, The Last Metro: A Sequence Analysis. The essay is posted to the great film site, Battleship Pretension.

Smile Power Day: Our top 5 cinematic reasons to smile

We all know the feeling. Every year, Smile Power Day comes around once more, bringing with it happiness and joy equal to a thousand laughing babies, or a field of smiling kittens – everyone in the world seems to have successfully embraced the power of the smile, that is, apart from you. Yes, we’re talking…

Surrealism: Dreams and the Unconscious (Freud and Dreams That Money Can Buy)

Important note: Here is an essay that I wrote for university; within it, I apply some psychoanalytical aspects of Freud’s theory of dreams to the 1947 surrealist film, Dreams That Money Can Buy. However, I first explain the theory and concept in some detail, which may be quite tiresome to readers only interested in approaching this essay by way of the film….

Smoke (1995) by Leila Murseljevic

I was asked the other day to, in just 5 seconds, name the first movie that pops on my mind, which fulfils the criteria of both simplicity and effectiveness at the same time. And let me tell you, for someone who takes the art of moving pictures very seriously, this was one of the toughest…

Our YouTube Channel

We know that A World of Film has been a little quiet recently. The site has had a small break, but we will be back very soon, and already have some articles in the pipeline. In the meantime, why not take a look at our new A World of Film YouTube channel for short video essays….

Everlasting Moments (2008) – Jan Troell (Pete Johnson)

As well as a lifetime romance with cinema and films, I have also had an interest in photography for the last thirty years. My favourite films are almost always foreign language productions, latterly known as ‘World Cinema’. There have been films made about photographers, and others featuring significant characters who happen to be photographers. These…

The First Official “A World of Film Top 10!”

So, here it is, Voting has ended, meaning it’s time to uncover the top 10 most voted for films by our readers. Thank you to everyone that commented or sent your lists by email. It’s great to know that we are slowly building a community of people that simply love film. First, some thoughts, I…

Shadows (1959) – Living in the Shadows, by Darrell Ron Tuffs

The first film to be directed by John Cassavetes, Shadows, was perhaps the start of what we now know as American independent cinema. Shadows was groundbreaking at the time of its release, although not particularly financially successful, it was critically acclaimed, despite being made for less than the average television programme. Filmed during the same…

Ed Wood (1994) – Tim Burton (Gunnar von Cowtown)

Originally posted to the excellence site Retro In The 90s After reflecting on the Joe Bob’s Drive-In Theatre post, perhaps the most important function of the horror movie host was telling all the stories behind the story shown on screen. The horror host’s knowledge added layers of context and depth to what basically amounted to…

Panic Room (2002) – David Fincher (Mikhail Karadimov)

Originally Posted at betweenframes.net. Come check out other reviews written by Mikhail Karadimov Panic Room has long been derided as one of Fincher’s lesser films. Maybe people had trouble accepting Fincher’s supposedly lame shift in subject matter—from the visceral, “in your face” bombast of Fight Club, to the restrained, small-scale follow-up of Panic Room—or maybe…

Sponsor Page!

Become a Sponsor Check out our new sponsor page For a short amount of time, we have been looking for a sponsor for “A World of Film”. We are still a relatively small site. However, our traffic grows each day, as the site becomes more popular. Our sponsorship plan is as follows. A link to…